Excerpt from "Letter to Dad" at the opening of CHAPTER THREE,
FROM GRANDMA'S TO GRADUATION
Copyright 2004, Rev 2005,  All Rights Reserved
(Every chapter opens with a posthumously written "Letter to Dad"
setting the stage for the oncoming chapter and serves as a constant
reminder of the key person in this far-reaching story.)



"This is a part of your life that you came to remember quite well after
you came back from that 'wilderness' of Woodmere that we will write
about in a later chapter.
Gosh, how I wish we had taken more time to think together about those
childhood days when you were well. I hope that others reading this will
take every opportunity possible to treasure childhood days with their
parents.
As we noted in the last chapter, our reflection upon the past must have
purpose. We hope that is true as we recall the good and bad of our
childhood days. You will remember that the purpose of this book is to
do just that, adding meaning to the past so that we can secure a better
emotional future for ourselves and others.
So here is some of the story of being a child and youth in the Gilbreath
family from 1929 to young adulthood. We will talk about such common
things as food, games, chores, school, cars, and more. Woven into this
childhood mosaic will be hindsight reflections on those times and their
influence on our emotional health.
And, Dad, we certainly will talk about your illness that comes at the end
of this period. It is that experience that continues to motivate us to
examine its relevance to our own mental health and that of our readers.
Closing paragraph........For the mental health of every child
everywhere, I pray that we all together will get serious about providing
the support system necessary for raising children to healthy adulthood.
How can anyone deny that 'It Takes a Village' unless one just wants to
be partisan. Deny our common responsibility if you will, but who got
where they are by the help of parents alone?
Mental health requires us to put our formative years into focus both as
a gift and as a personal responsibility, what was done for us and what
we will now do for others."
     FROM  GRANDMA'S  TO  GRADUATION  

     CHILDHOOD  EXPERIENCES  IN  RURAL  INDIANA,  
                                  Mental health issues in the experience of growing up
Pete and Fleda and young son, Gene, the
author of a story never dreamed about in days
of 1929.  It would be about seventy years
before the unique story could be read.        
Graysville School in 2013 where all three attended in their separate
histories.  A public Charter School under the auspices of Ball State
University, Muncie, Indiana, still prepares students for tomorrow
with knowledge and mentally healthy attitudes.
The "place-based
curriculum" is now being used under the direction of the author's niece.  Long
ago when Chapter Four on education was written the author believed he would
have fared better academically had he learned the local history prior to being
exposed to history far away.